3 Hibiscus Plants : That Will Rock Your Home Garden

Some of the most stunning blooms in my home garden this week are coming from the Hibiscus Plants.  There are three different types of hibiscus in my garden and I ‘m going to share them with a growing tip for you today on this blog post.

Perennial Hibiscus

In the image below is my is perennial hibiscus (rose mallow)and one might think this is bloom will steal the show in my garden today but wait until you see the front porch hibiscus later in this post.  The beetles enjoy the leaves on this plant but the bloom doesn’t seem to mind.   I’m anxiously waiting for the large variety I have in the front garden to bloom later this week so I can share the amazing size of that flower.  The plant is so easy to grow as long as you give it full sun and try to add organic mulch in early spring.perennial hibiscus

 

This Perennial Hibiscus (Rose Mallow) will bloom for most of the month of August into September with little to no maintenance. 

Tropical Hibiscus

I’ve been collecting tropical hibiscus ever since I met the wonderful growers at Costa Farms in 2008.  My collection has grown and I’m able to keep these southern growers overwinter in my sunroom, greenhouse, and let my dome here in NW Ohio.  The blooms on these tropicals provide instant beauty and were blooming with my tulips in early spring.  These plants like to be fed so be sure to give them lots of love to continue blooms.

 

A Few of My Tropical Hibiscus Blooming On My Front Porch During Summer Months

Rose Of Sharon ( Bush Hibiscus ) 

Hibiscus syriacus is a species of flowering plant in the mallow family, Malvaceae. It is native to south-central and southeast China. The Rose of Sharon shrub was the first bush I added to my home in 1993.  The shrub reminds me of growing up in the city as a child.  My parents had a Rose of Sharon that bloomed white right off the front porch.  Today I have many different varieties of the Rose of Sharon including a few that begin blooming in late August. Below you will find my doubling Rose of Sharon that begins blooming in late July.  The only thing I have to do to this hibiscus is to provide a growing space with lots of sunshine and add a nice dressing of compost mulch in the spring.

The images above show my Rose of Sharon that is booming right now in my garden.  A few are still just forming buds for a late summer bloom.  The biggest enemy of the hibiscus blooms during the summer months outdoors is the Japanese Beetle.

Let’s Connect

I hope this post inspires you to check out the Hibiscus available for you at your local garden center.  There is a hibiscus that will suit your blooming preference so I hope you will check them out and try one of each if you have the space.

Happy Gardening,

Bren Haas

Bren Haas

Bren Haas

Bren Haas is the creator of GardenChat which is the first online gardening social community using social media. Her website features gardening tips and tricks, recipes, travel ideas, product reviews, and social media how-to help from her personal and unique experiences.

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6 thoughts on “3 Hibiscus Plants : That Will Rock Your Home Garden”

  1. Thanks for a great post! I have 3 rose mallows in my zone 4 garden that are just about to bloom. Thankfully, I don’t have too much problem with beetles….yet! I love your tropical blooms….gorgeous. I’ve been thinking of adding a few and overwintering them in my home. .

    Reply
    • Beth – it is so super easy and ADDICTIVE to grow the tropical hibiscus in containers. They may loose most of their leaves in the winter but come spring when the heat and sun hits them you will have a beautiful blooming shrub!

      Reply
  2. Beautiful! I absolutely love hibiscus!! I have a large rose mallow like yours right near my front steps. It’s got lots of buds, but has yet to bloom. The beetles have enjoyed mine, too.

    Reply
  3. Love this. Trying to keep an eye out for the rose of Sharon. Can’t find anywhere. All mine are tropical or what I like to call sub-tropical. Here in north-west Florida, we may get a tiny bit of frost but that’s all it takes to take out my tropicals. I have some of the sub-tropical in the ground but if there is any possibility of frost I cover with blankets. My tropicals if it drops below 50 I bring indoors

    Reply

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