Grateful Red Hydrangea in My Ohio Garden

Now is the time to plant perennials, trees and shrubs in my hardiness zone 5b home garden.  I’m pretty excited about some of the fun new plants I’m adding to the landscape this Autumn. One that I can’t wait to experience as we get ready for winter is the Grateful Red Hydrangea.  Did you think ‘Grateful Deads’ when you read that?!?!  In today’s post, I’m going to share a few tips about growing and planting hydrangeas so be sure to comment below and tell me what you think about this plant!
Grateful Red Hydrangea in My Ohio Garden
 My beautiful new addition to the garden is a gift from Nature Hills Nursery.

About the Grateful Red Hydrangea

Grateful Red® Hydrangea, Hydrangea macrophylla ‘McKRed’, is an introduction from Wisconsin’s McKay Nursery. It has all of the characteristics of your favorite garden hydrangeas – big leaves and even bigger blooms coming all summer long in the shade. With alkaline soils the flowers are a deep pink verging on red that is unlike any other hydrangea on the market. As autumn approaches the flowers turn a velvety lavender color that is eye-catching with the purple tint of the leaves. In acidic soils the flower will be of a darker purple color. Growing 3-4 ft high, the Grateful Red® Hydrangea will be the star of your shady garden or border. Plant it where you can enjoy its unique coloration often as you walk by it. Make sure that you can reach it to cut the red blooms, too, because it will provide you with armfuls of flowers for your vases all season.

This is a best seller and bound to be a superstar in your garden this year!

  • Totally unique red flowers
  • Easy to grow in the shade
  • Only available online!

My Grateful Red Hydrangea 

How to Plant the Hydrangea

I’m in hardiness zone 5b Ohio so this is the perfect time to plant shrubs and trees as long as you remember water if it is a dry season.

Winter Hydrangea Care

There are several types of hydrangeas. Some bloom on old wood, some on new and some on both. In zone 5, buds on old wood are often frozen during harsh winter weather. The result is a green plant with few or no flowers. Covering hydrangeas is a trick used to help keep the buds from freezing. There are several types of hydrangeas, each having different requirements.

Let’s Connect

What are you planting this Autumn in your Garden?  Do you grow Hydrangeas?  I’d love to connect with you so please comment on this post below.  Have a great weekend out in the garden.

Happy Gardening,

 

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