Remembering the Ash Trees In My Northwest Ohio Garden

Do you remember Ash Trees?  In this post,  remembering the ash trees in my Northwest Ohio Garden featuring a video of the majestic trees.

The Ash Trees

When we first moved to the country we were captivated by the beautiful trees in the flood plain wooded property we own.  I am so thankful that we took video of the beautiful trees dancing in the wind.  Little did we know the ash beetle had already made up home in them.  Enjoy the video  and share with your friends using the social media links on this site.

Soon after the Emerald Ash Borer was recognized in our county it was too late. Ash trees infested with the beetle die within five years. This invasive pest belongs to a group of metallic-colored, wood-boring beetles. Adults are dark metallic green, one-half inch long, one-eighth inch wide. Larvae spend most of its life beneath the bark of ash trees, damaging the trees’ water and nutrient-transporting tissues. When the larvae emerge as adults, they leave behind one-eighth inch D-shaped exit holes in the bark.

Resource 

Let’s Connect

Did your area lose the ash trees?  Do you have new growth on the old trunks left behind? I’d love it if you commented on this post to tell me your story.  Be sure to stop by my contact page so we can stay in touch.

Happy Gardening,

bren_sign_black

 

5 thoughts on “Remembering the Ash Trees In My Northwest Ohio Garden”

  1. How sad, Bren … reminds me of when we moved here to our home 35 years ago and fell in love with the tree lined streets and the 8 majestic American elms on our property, now most gone due to Dutch Elm Disease.

    Reply
  2. It is awfully sad to lose these trees to a pest. Hopefully someone will develop a bullet proof tree to combat the pests and diseases. Like Joey I remember those elm trees and still miss them.

    Reply

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