How I Keep My Garden Containers Happy For Years To Come

It’s that time of year when the Midwest is participating in the race against time to beat old man winters arrival. One of the many tasks during this time is to prepare the containers for winter storage.  In today’s post, I am sharing How I Keep My Garden Containers Happy For Years To Come.

Autumn Care For Containers

cat container

Every year before the hard frost arrives I decided which plants I want to enjoy indoor for the winter.  While deciding on these plants I also have to consider the containers I’m going to grow them in.  With my greenhouse, I prefer to transplant many of the annuals, herbs, and perennials into plastic growing containers that I’ve recycled.  The decorative containers will be cared for and put away for storge.

Garden Containers Care Tips

1. Empty containers soil into the compost pile for winter.

2. using a wire brush and hose gentle scrub the inside of the container from all soil and green that may be present.

3.  Be sure to the container is completely dry before storing indoors to prevent bacteria growth and also freeze damage.

4. Allow plenty of room when stacking the containers in storage.  The changing of the season can cause the container to expand and break if nestled tight against one another.

5.  Take a photo of your containers in storage so you can refer to them while you plan out your spring garden during the winter months.

We all love what our beautiful garden provides us with during most of the year so let’s remember to let those containers know we appreciate all that they do by taking the time to care for them.

Let’s Connect,

I would love to hear from you and what your favorite container looks like. Do you have a special tip to share with me today?  Be sure to comment on this post or reach out to me on my website today.

Happy Gardening,

Bren Haas

4 thoughts on “How I Keep My Garden Containers Happy For Years To Come”

  1. I like to save my containers for growing all of my herbs in. It keeps them from becoming and invasive endeavor, and makes labeling and harvesting easier. The best part is most perennial herbs can be brought right next to the back door for easier access during the winter months, saving the trek through the snow.

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