Get Ready For Fall Planting With New Varieties From High Country Gardens

High Country Gardens, a top online source for tough perennial plants that thrive in even the most challenging conditions, has introduced new perennials for Fall 2016 planting. The new varieties include Fringed Poppy Mallow that boasts bright magenta flowers and the pollinator magnet Englemann’s Daisy.

“In many ways autumn is the ideal planting season,” says David Salman, chief horticulturist of High Country Garden. “The fall planting season, from late-August through October, is an excellent time to plant cold-hardy perennials, shrubs and trees. Planting in the fall gives a plant the chance to establish its roots before freezing weather sets in. As a result, plants started in the fall will be larger and have more flowers than those planted the following spring.”

All of the plants described below—and hundreds of perennial favorites—are available at www.highcountrygardens.com.

[alert-warning]Fringed Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe digitata)[/alert-warning]

Fringed Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe digitata)Native to the mid-section of the US (from Illinois and Indiana down into Oklahoma and Arkansas), Fringed Poppy Mallow is very different from the more familiar groundcover Poppy Mallow (Callirhoe involucrata). This species has a low growing rosette of fine textured foliage from which 3-foot- tall, wispy stems topped with winecup-shaped magenta flowers arise. (Hence the other common name for this family of plants: Winecups.) The flowers seem to float enchantingly above the garden. Blooming all summer, Fringed Poppy Mallow is a great plant to mix into the mid-section of the perennial border or into more naturalistic plantings with blue flax (Linum), orange milkweed (Asclepias tuberosa), gay feather (Liatris) and native grasses like little bluestem (Schizachyrium) and blue grama (Bouteloua). USDA zones 4-8. Grows 36 inches tall and 12-15 inches wide. Deer and rabbit resistant. $9.99 per plant.

[alert-warning]Engelmann’s Daisy (Englemannia peristenia)[/alert-warning]

Engelmann's Daisy (Englemannia peristenia)Engelmann's Daisy is a tough but colorful native plant that blooms all summer. Its bouquets of bright yellow daisies start late spring and continue throughout the heat of summer. The nectar-rich flowers are especially attractive to butterflies and bees. This wildflower is native across the western Great Plains into Texas, New Mexico and Colorado, and it is extremely adaptable and resilient. Engelmann’s Daisy grows well in all types of soil including clay, and seems to be impervious to heat and cold. It is easy to grow and will re-seed itself gently, like blue flax, when happy in its garden home. “If you can’t grow Englemann’s Daisy, find another hobby,” says David Salman, chief horticulturist of High Country Gardens. USDA zones 4-8. Grows 18-36 inches tall and 15-18 inches wide. Deer and rabbit resistant, especially good for attracting butterflies and bees. $9.99 per plant.

[alert-warning]Cobweb Spiderwort (Tradescantia sillamontana)[/alert-warning]

Cobweb Spiderwort (Tradescantia sillamontana)

In nature, this Mexican native gem is only found at high elevations in the Sierra Madre Mountains near Monterey, Mexico. It boasts cobwebbed grey-green foliage and a mid-summer display of bright pink impatiens-like flowers. Cobweb Spiderwort has been personally tested by David Salman is his USDA zone 6 garden for over a decade, and it has demonstrated excellent cold hardiness and impressive garden performance. This tough plant is an outstanding groundcover for garden beds in both sun and shade, and it will become a long-lived resident of any dry landscape. Once established after its first growing season, grow it on the dry side to accentuate the cobwebs on the handsome foliage. USDA zones 6-10. Grows 6-8 inches tall and 16-20 inches wide. Deer and rabbit resistant. $9.99 per plant.

[alert-warning]Texas Blazing Star (Liatris mucronata)[/alert-warning]

Liatris mucronata Texas Blazing StarTexas Blazing Star (Liatris mucronata) is a large, showy perennial that blooms in late summer to attract numerous butterflies to its nectar-rich lavender-pink flowers. This Liatris species offers an amazing display of tall, lavender-pink flowers—and each flower stalk is a true magnet for pollinators. Originating from the plains of northern Texas, Oklahoma and the Southern Great Plains, this resilient plant is a more xeric (waterwise) choice than Liatris ligulistylus and Liatris aspera, and it is best for drier planting sites. Texas Blazing Star (Liatris mucronata) will grow well in USDA zones 5- 9. Grows 24-30 inches tall and 18 inches wide. Deer resistant, attracts butterflies. $7.99 per plant.

[alert-warning]Partridge Feather (Tanacetum densum ssp. amani)[/alert-warning]

Partridge Feather (Tanacetum densum ssp. amani)One of the very best sun- and heat-tolerant groundcovers for the Great Plains and Western US, Partridge Feather grows to form large, flat mats of stunning fuzzy silver-white evergreen foliage. In early summer, the plant flowers with numerous yarrow-like yellow flowers. The key to successful culture of this durable native of southwestern Turkey is “tough love” gardening: Go easy on the water, plant only in a lean fast-draining soil, use minimal fertilizer (a light side dressing of compost in the fall) and only use a coarse textured mulch like crushed gravel. This plant really likes a dry environment. Partridge Feather resents humid weather and moist, fertile soil. It also dislikes bark and other mulch materials that stay wet over the winter months. A Plant Select winner. USDA zones 4-9. Grows 4-6 inches tall and 18-24 inches wide. Deer and rabbit resistant. $7.99 per plant.

For a complete look at all of the plants for Fall 2016 available from High Country Gardens, visit www.highcountrygardens.com.

[alert-success]What will you plant new in the garden this Autumn?  I’d love to connect with you so please share by commenting on this blog post.

Happy Autumn Gardening,

bren_sign_black[/alert-success]

Leave a Comment

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on pinterest
Share on linkedin
Share on reddit
Share on stumbleupon
Share on tumblr
Share on email
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on stumbleupon
Share on tumblr
Share on reddit
Share on digg
Share on print
Share on email

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website.